It raises only Pius XII`s second question, which concerns the “practical attitude” of the government to religious pluralism. It responds to this question by stating that, in the current circumstances, it has no mandate, duty or right to legislate for or against any of the religious denominations that exist in American society and that the government must represent as a whole. It is therefore only a question of their freedom to exist in the face of civil law, since they really exist. It is precisely the practical attitude that Pius XII recognizes as the right moral and political orientation. It is interesting to note that the same parable of Pius XII is mentioned in his speech to a group of Italian jurists on December 6, 1953. This speech is a strong confirmation of the primacy of the principle of peace (or “union”, which is the word synonymous with the Pope) when it comes to facing the “difficulties and tendencies” that arise from the multiple pluralisms and opinions of humanity. The “fundamental theoretical principle”, says the Pope (and the word “theoretical” must be emphasized, it is not a question of pure pragmatism and even less of expediency in the low sense of the term), it is: “within the limits of the possible and legitimate, to promote everything that makes the union easier and more effective; remove anything that bothers him; sometimes tolerate what is impossible to correct, but which must not be allowed to sink the Community which seeks a higher good.┬áThis higher good is in the context of the whole “peace-building” discourse. It started with the Alliance of Religions (WARP) World Summit in 2014, during which leaders representing 12 religions signed the Unity of Religion Agreement with 950 participants. At that time, the WARP Office Meeting was established and has been actively practiced around the world ever since. A strong collaboration and network of religious communities formed by the engagement of people at the 2014 WARP Summit were integrated with a deeper understanding of the fundamental principles and values of each scripture. Building on this objective norm, regardless of differences in religious, ethnic and cultural backgrounds, the resulting network contributes closely to the conduct of mediation, reconciliation consultations and other activities in times of contention. Thus, within the framework of its Alliance of Religions Initiative, recalling the promised agreement for the unity of religions, the HWPL has encouraged interreligious communication among religious leaders, who play a key role in raising awareness among its communities of differences in religious beliefs in a way that should not hinder progress in achieving peace in the world. On the 19st The Walk for World Peace took place at the World Peace Gate of the Seoul Olympic Park with about 200,000 people from home and abroad.

At the ensuing press conference, the host organization presented the peace agreements signed at the WARP summit and invited journalists to become peace ambassadors and report frequently on the peace agreements of the WARP summit. . . .