The share of researchers` copyright claimed by publishers is very variable. Some publishers require researchers to transfer their copyright in full (as far as possible) to the publisher, while other publishers indicate more precisely which part of the copyright will be transferred to the publisher (e.g. .B. with regard to the form of publication, the scope of publication, the language of publication, etc.). Since these agreements typically involve at least some transfer of copyright to your publisher, they can restrict or undermine your ability to use your work. Before signing a publication agreement, you should take into account the uses you wish to make in the future, including: this wording should be considered as reflecting the duty of loyalty that applies in principle to all publishing contracts subject to Danish law. If there is an error in the registration of a character, the usual procedure is to publish a correction sentence. A major error in the figure itself is corrected by publishing a new corrected figure as a publisher correction. The image is only redrawed if the editorial member feels it is necessary for a reader to understand it. If there is no public repository and the records are too large to be transmitted online to the journal, authors should provide the publishing team with two separate copies of this data in an appropriate format (e.g. B CD or DVD) for peer review.

Members of the Scientific Reports Editorial Board can consult with the Editorial Advisory Panel and the internal editorial team on every aspect of a submitted manuscript that raises concerns. This may include, for example, ethical issues or issues of access to data or materials. Very occasionally, concerns may also relate to the impact of the publication of a document on society, including the security threat. In such circumstances, advice is usually sought at the same time as the technical peer review process. Some editorial agreements leave it to the publisher to define the details of the publication, so that the publication can be done depending on the case by any other secondary print (or perhaps from a totally different publishing house) than the researchers expected. A provision on this subject may be as follows: “Publishers may publish and distribute the work under each of its imprints”. Such a provision should not normally be accepted in agreements for the publication of research publications. For researchers, it may therefore be essential that the publication takes place on a given publishing house. ยง 18 of the UBVA contract (2010) therefore contains a contrary rule: some editorial contracts give the publishing house the right to make changes to the manuscript, including for example the title of a work, without such modifications having to be approved by researchers.

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